I wished there would never be a next time. No more people being killed by Sin. No more sendings for Yuna. Everyone stood there watching her. It was strange, and somehow…horrifying. I never wanted to see it again.

fairytalemood:

"Tristan and Isolde" by slevinaaron (Bartosz Madej)

Moonrise over Esja, a winter afternoon in Reykjavík. December 2010.

ofsparrows:

I like to think that Howl and Calcifer just sat down and had tea and a chat once in a while. You would too if your fireplace were a sentient fire demon. It’s one of the perks.

(Super late submission to ghibli jam, which I only found out about at 10PM last night (!) Process on twitter.)

dany + getting real tired of your shit

simplystormie:

prismatic-bell:

niall-ate-mynamee:

cinderellawaitinforherprince:

heyfunniest:

zeebsdarling:

anus:

renkris:

Gordon Ramsay doesn’t care about your gender, race, or creed. All he cares about is that you can cook.

The contestant, Christine, is blind, and he lets her know exactly what he thinks of her dish.

OMG I was preparing myself to be enraged by him making some horrible comment but now I’m crying in Starbucks GOD DAMMIT

Christ I am not okay with these fEELINGS

IM BAWLING

That’s so cute I wanna cry

Is there a Gordon Ramsay fan base on this site??? And where can i join???

Spoilers, she won. Her cookbook is on sale now.

Also, this is the very first apple pie she ever made.

Also, can we please take notice OF HOW HE DESCRIBES IT FOR HER? Ramsay was extremely conscious during the entire season that she would require different tactics than the other contestants; this was not the only time he became her eyes, nor the only time he did things like that scrape of the knife so she could actually have a sense of her work.

And if you really want to bawl like a baby? During final four or final three, I forget which, the remaining contestants got photos from home. Christine’s husband sent their wedding photo—which she had never seen. Ramsay paused before starting the challenge to describe to her not only her husband—the look of love and joy on his face—but also herself as a bride, so she could see in her mind how the two of them looked together on their wedding day.

It was extremely obvious nobody had ever thought to do that before.

This man should be a fucking icon not just for his cooking, but for how he treats those who are different. During the same season he asked a handsome young man, making conversation during auditions, if he had a girlfriend. The man responded that he was gay. Ramsay, without missing a beat: “I’m sorry. Have you got a boyfriend, then?” No drama, no “oh my GOSH! You’re GAY? TOKEN CHARACTER :DDDD” just a very quick, simple whoops-my-mistake and the corrected inquiry. And then he never brought it up again! It was just a thing he learned, getting to know a contestant.

Yes, he can be harsh on MasterChef and downright cruel on Hell’s Kitchen (although if you were a sous chef and you served me raw pork that was not pork tartare, I’d scream too). But he’s not an ogre; he’s a polite man with a gigantic heart who simply happens to take no shit from those who should know better.

I love him so much like at first I was scared of him now I just respect him

yuropyon:

It was a matter of time

orchidmantid:

milkshakes! the next comic for my minicomics class completed. now i gotta scram to the office depot and get this business PRINTED!!

idk i love girls, i love girls in love. enjoy

showslow:

Sir Lawrence Alma-Tadema (8 January 1836 – 25 June 1912) was a Dutch painter of special British denizenship.

Born in Dronrijp, the Netherlands, and trained at the Royal Academy of Antwerp, Belgium, he settled in England in 1870 and spent the rest of his life there. A classical-subject painter, he became famous for his depictions of the luxury and decadence of the Roman Empire, with languorous figures set in fabulous marbled interiors or against a backdrop of dazzling blue Mediterranean Sea and sky.

Though admired during his lifetime for his draftsmanship and depictions of Classical antiquity, his work fell into disrepute after his death, and only since the 1960s has it been re-evaluated for its importance within nineteenth-century English art.